Native Haunts Plant List-2017


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Perennials

Species

Common name

Description

Size

Price each

# Available

Asclepias incarnata Swamp milkweed Showy clusters of purple flowers highly attractive to butterflies and pollinators, clusters are tighter then in common milkweed; found growing in open wetlands in nature, but takes well to upland gardens, albeit at a smaller size. 3 gallon 15.00 1
Asclepias syriaca Common milkweed Who would of thought, even 5 years ago, that there would be a demand for milkweed plants or seeds? It would take the dramatic collapse of one of our most beloved and recognizable butterflies for people to recognize that the lowly Milkweed might have some value after all. Many other pollinators are attracted to Milkweeds as well, including wasps and other species of butterflies. Out plants are 1 year olds with well established root systems. 3 gallon 12.00 1 plant, trays of seedlings available too
Chelone glabra Turtlehead Found growing along well vegetated margins of lakes, streams, and wetland meadows in full sun; can be grown in moist, even dry loamy upland soils in cultivation; large bulbous pure white hooded flowers bares an uncanny resemblance to its name sake; unique addition to the sunny perennial garden. 12"plants 8.00 2
Clematis virginiana Virgins bower This native Clematis flowers profusely in August where it attracts scores of pollinating insects; flowers are about dime sized and are lace-white; found growing in open, part to full sun areas, usually with loamy soils; one of our showiest vines. 10"-12" long, 2-3 gal 15.00 3
Eupatorium perfoliatum Boneset A fantastic and unique addition to the perennial garden- stem clasping leaves give the appearance that the stem is perforating them; hairy stems and leaves, large heads of off-white flowers are handsome and attractive to pollinators, slightly reminiscent of Yarrow; in nature it is largely associated with wetlands, but grows well in upland areas too; full to part sun, wet to dry upland soils 1-2 gal 12.00 5
Eutrochium fistulosum Hollow Joe Pye Weed Smaller growing then spotted Joe pye; prefers moist open meadows/fields; darker pink colored blooms attract large numbers of pollinators including butterflies; great choice for gardens where Spotted joe pye would be too overwhelming 1 gallon 10.00 4
Eutrochium maculatum Spotted Joe Pye Weed This species can be a tall grower, reaching well above 5-6 feet in some cases; prefers moist open meadows/fields where its lightish pink colored blooms attract large numbers of pollinators including butterflies. 16" X 18" tray 15.00 1
Eurybia macrophylla Big leaved Aster Forms a thick, dense carpet of luscious green leaves in ecotone areas-habitats between field in forest, where it is simultaneously intolerant of the excessive shade of the forest, and sensitive to the searing sun of wide open spaces, like Goldilocks, it likes its just right; grows equally well in moist to dry soils; pretty white flowers grow on stalks from August through November; a great natural, intensive ground cover option. large clumps 12.00 6
Geranium maculatum Wild geranium Ecotonal species in nature found growing on the edges of forests/clearings and in forests with a loose canopy; tolerant of some intrusion by grass in its growing area without being overwhelmed; attractive med-large light purple flowers in spring; interesting catapult-like seed dispersal mechanism. 2-3 gal. 12.00 5
Iris versicolor Wild iris Forget the Bearded Irises, you'll never look back when you see this beauty; dainty, delicate leaves, rich royal blue/purple petals with yellow markings; grows in wet areas in the wild (pond margins, wetland meadows) with full sun, but also tolerant of drier soils. multi year rhizomes 12.00 2
Maianthemum stellatum Star-like false solomons seal Loose colony forming plant that grows about 6" high; attractive star shaped flowers;found growing in Maine near the ocean in poor sandy soils; drought tolerant. well developed clusters 12.00 5
Maianthemum racemosum False Solomons seal Graceful arching stems lined with opposite pairs of leaves, terminal clusters of creamy-green colored flowers give rise to distinctively patterned berries in late summer that begin a metallic gold color and matures to a spectacular semi translucent cranberry sparkle; grows well in the dappled shade of a deciduous forest canopy, often found growing in the forest shadow at the edge of a clearing with other ecotone plants like Big leaf aster (Aster macrophylla),Forest goldenrod (Solidago arguta), Bridal wreath goldenrod (Solidago caesia) and Wood lily (Lilium philadelphicum)2 gallon size 12.00 10
Sibbalidiopsis tridentata Three toothed cinquefoil A hardy, splendid little plant growing in sterile sandy/rocky areas from the oceanside to the mountaintops; many white rosaceous flowers in the spring giving way to bright red foliage in the fall; tolerates full sun with little water needed. 6-8" rhizomes 12.00 3
Solidago caesia Blue stem goldenrod The prettiest of all the goldenrods, attractive dark green/blue foliage and stems, lined with dainty chrome yellow flowers; does well in full to part shade; stems do not grow ram-rod straight and tall like most other G-rods, but stay short and tend to curve around like that of a wreath. 2-3 yr plants 12.00 3
Thalictrum pubescens Tall Meadow-rue Tall and striking perennial thriving in moist shady areas; compound leaves are a luscious bluish green; one of those rare plants that has both attractive foliage and wonderful flowers; we're not the only ones who appreciate the flowers-dozens of insect pollinators come to visit the blooms; a member of the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae). 2 year old plants 12.00 15
Tiarella cordifolia Foam flower Ground covering perennial found in moist forests and swamps; spikes of white flowers in spring; palmate leaves with purple/red veination on leaves; common in the hort. trade, but of course ours is non-varietal propagated from material collected in northern NH 6"X6" clumps 12.00 6

Trees, Shrubs, and Vines

Species

Common name

Description

Size

Price each

# Available

Acer pennsylvanicum Striped maple Small under story tree/shrub of moist upland forests; smooth green bark with vertical white stripes contrasts wonderfully and makes for a spectacular specimen for the shade garden; obligate shade plant. These have to be picked up or delivered due to size. 36"+ $15.00 8
Aronia arbutifolia Red chokeberry Eye catching bright red berries; brilliant burgundy Fall foliage make this a perfect replacement for nasty ole burning bush; this species is from the eastern United states, reaching its northern limit in Massachusetts, from here Black chokeberry takes over; not used for nutri-ceutical properties like Black chokeberry. 8" $10.00 8
Aronia melanocarpa Black chokeberry Highly adaptable shrub, growing in both saturated wetlands and bone dry sandy soils, tends to remain more compact in the latter; tart berries are loaded with beneficial phytochemicals like phenols and antioxidants; juice is used in value added products like wine, yogurt, and juice blends; dark colored anthers contrast against bright white flower petals make for eye catching effect 8"-16" $14.00 10
Carpinus caroliniana Muscle wood, Blue beech Small tree or large shrub, most often found growing in forested floodplains of rivers and moist forests; vertically contoured striated wood looks like the trunk is flexing ripped muscles (hence the name); our specimens for sale are a few years old and are not flexing their muscles yet, but will in time. A rare gem not often found in the nursery trade. 12" 15.00 4
Cephalanthus occidentalis Button Bush Wetland shrub that forms almost golf ball sized, nearly perfectly spherical flowers that entice big butterflies such as fritillaries and yellow tiger swallow tails; multi-branched structure serves as scaffolding for salamanders and frogs to attach their egg masses to, especially in vernal pools. I haven't tried planting this one in upland areas, but it would be an interesting trial. >12", 2-3 gal 10.00 6
Comptonia peregrina Sweetfern It is neither sweet, nor a fern, but its leaves do have a very distinctive mint like odor when crushed; a pioneering species, Sweetfern will grow in barren,sandy soil when few other plants are present; roots host nitrogen fixing bacteria; attractive lanceolate shaped, coarsely serrated leaves are a unique edition to the garden; starting to see this planted out more and more into landscapes. >16" $15.00 1
Diervilla lonicera Bush honeysuckle Low growing, spreading shrub with multi-colored flowers (red,orange, yellow); prefers partly shaded upland areas, tolerates dry soils; sensational autumn leaf color radiating shades of red, orange and yellow 2 gallon 15.00 3
Hamamelis virginiana Witch hazel Multi stemmed habit, often dominates the shrub layer in moist deciduous forests; leaves have been used for centuries as a powerful astringent; the preferred wood for water dowsing- the mystical art of sensing water using a forked piece of wood; branches are densely covered in pastel yellow flowers in the fall lighting up a dying landscape, often lasting until snow fall; prefers shade. 12"+ 15.00 5
Myrica gale Sweet gale Attractive stream and lake side shrub, usually growing in gravelly substrate; leaves and seed capsules are waxy and have a distinctive odor much like that of its landlubber cousin Sweet fern (Comptonia peregrina, which isn't really a fern; root have nodules that house nitrogen fixing bacteria, like Sweet fern; leaves are small and sea foam green in color; despite its wetland preference in the wild, it takes well to drier conditions in cultivation; leaves are a food source for the Cercopia moth. 10" $10.00 1
Parthenocissus quinquefolia Virginia creeper Spectacular bright red foliage in Fall; sucker disks on tendrils have a wickedly tenacious grip allowing this vine to easily scale trees, as well as chimneys, cement walls and the like, making it an outstanding replacement for the sometimes invasive Helix hedera, or English ivy; sparse purple fruit formed in Fall are reminiscent of mini-grapes, in fact, it is in the grape family- Vitaceae. 12" $10.00 1-2
Pinus rigida Pitch pine By White pine standards, a shorter tree of sandy soils near the ocean and on glacial out-wash plains; the Pitch pine is the major component of the globally rare Pitch Pine forest type, which is home to rare plants as well as moths and butterflies-the Nature Conservancy has many hundreds of acres preserved here in southern Maine; capable of growing in soil extremes-bone dry sand with a razor thin layer of organic matter to seasonally inundated Sphagnum moss bogs; will make a great solitary specimen tree. These are too big to be shipped now and have to be picked up or we can deliver. >36"+ on sale-$15.00 8
Prunus maritima Beach plum Dune dwelling shrub of the Atlantic coast decimated over the past century due largely to rampant and ruthless shoreline development; provides valuable ecosystem services in its habitat where it stabilizes fragile dune soils and provides food for many animal species; plums in the fall can be made into jams, jellies, and wines; takes very well to cultivation; full sun, lower fertility soils. 12", 3 gal 15.00 2
Prunus virginina Chokecherry Suckering colonial shrub producing abundant strings of beautiful ruby red cherries in mid Summer, savored by birds and mammals of all sizes, not lasting long on the branch; excellent hedge species providing structure, food, and habitat for fauna; prefers loamy upland soil in full to part sun; an under-rated species for inclusion into the landscape despite its many outstanding qualities. 12", 2-3 gal 14.00 3
Rosa carolina Pasture rose Floriferous native rose found growing in open fields; simple, slightly ruffled large petals with a sweet fragrance; may be prone to powdery mildew if watered excessively, but none of the fungal problems that plague the hybrid roses; hardy and does not require the nuclear assault of chemicals that domesticated hybrid roses are addicted to. 12"+, 3 gal 15.00 5
Sorbus americana Mountain ash Mountain ash is a common ornamental, BUT, almost all of them are European mountain ash; our seed is true American mountain ash, from seed collected along the Kancamagus Highway in New Hampshire; prolific large clusters of pretty red berries in Fall; besides looking pretty, the berries are quite healthy to eat too, containing lots of vitamin c; closely related to Aronia, the two genera can form hybrids. >12", 2-3 gal 15.00 4
Viburnum lentago Nanny berry Like Vandals sacking Rome, the Blue jays will not stop coming until they have eaten every fruit, so the fruit must be "THAT GOOD"; in terms of form, this species often has a single stem with a tight over-arching canopy making it look like a big Bonsai and hence a good specimen plant; it will sucker and form colonies as well; most common in open moist areas, but will grow happily in upland areas too. 12"+, 2-3 gal 20.00 4


How to order plants

You can get your plants in a number of convenient ways. We can ship you plants via United Parcel Service (UPS) if you live far away. We can deliver your plants to you if you live near-by (There is a minimum order requirement or delivery fee added on if you live more then 1/2 hour away). You can stop by and chat, browse our selection and pick out your plants at the nursery, but please call ahead, as we do not have regular hours.

E-mail (nativehaunts@gmail.com) us with the plants that you would like, I will respond promptly with plant availability. I find this system works well because it avoids the disappointment of sending in for a plant your really, really want, only to find out a couple weeks later when the order comes in that it is out of stock. E-mailing me with your request is like taking a ticket at the deli counter- it ensures your place in line and gets you the plants you want.

Mail in your order. Print out the Native Haunts Plant Order Form (in PDF format), fill out and mail.

Call in your order: 1-207-604-8655.


Shipping and Handling Costs

This is based on each individual order. I have tried to come up with set shipping rates based on cost, but this does not prove to be accurate. For a rough estimate, figure on about 20% of the total order.


Payment

We accept Visa, Master Card, and Discover credit cards.

Paypal and payment by check is accepted.
Good old fashioned cash works too, but for pick-up only.


Nomenclature

Nomenclature, or naming, follows Flora Novae Angliae, 2011 by Arthur Haines and the New England Wildflower Society. Synonyms, abbreviated syn, are included when appropriate for previous names that folks may be more familiar with. Of course, these are the same plants, but with new names to try and learn. Botanists love to change names around on us, but it is usually for good reason. Although botanical reshuffling has happened since the time of Linneaus, now-a-days it's due to new findings at the molecular level which reveals relationships that may not have been so obvious using traditional classification systems.





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Last updated on Feb 10, 2017.